Glossary of Print Terms

Print Terms

Curious about printer's terms? Here are some of the most common print industry terms along with helpful definitions. Still have a question? Please contact us.

4-Panel Roll Fold
Accordion Fold
Aqueous Coating
Barcode
Bindery
Binding
Bleed
Blurb
Borders
Brightness
Bulk Mail
C1S paper
C2S paper
Card Stock
Carrier Route
CMYK
Coating
Color Proof / Epson Proof / Match Print
Color Types
Consecutive Numbering
Crop Marks (Guide Marks)
Die Cutting
Direct Mail
Dots per Inch (DPI)
Double Gate Fold
Double Parallel Fold
Dummy
Embossing
Film Laminate
Finished Size / Trim Size
Finishing
Fixed Costs
Flat Size
Folding
French Fold (Quarter Fold)
Full Bleed
Gate Fold
Gloss Finish
Gloss Paper
Gray Scale
Grippers
Hairline
Half Fold
Half-Tri-Fold
Head to Head
Head-to-Toe
Hickey
Imprinting
In House
Ink Jet
Insert
ISBN
Job Number
Landscape
Line Screen
Line-of-Travel (LOT) Sequence
Make-Ready
Margin
Offset Printing
Open End Envelope
Open Side Envelope
Out of Register / Off Register
Output
Overprinting
Overruns / Overs
Pantone Matching System (PMS)
Paper
Paper Grain
Perfecting
Perfector
Perforation
Permit
Pixel
Plate
Postage
Pre-Press
Presentation Folder
Press
Press Check
Press Proof
Press Run
Price Break
Processing
Proofread
Proofs
Punching
Quotation
Resolution
RGB
Rotation
Round Cornering
Samples
Scoring
Set Up
Shrink Wrapping
Skid / Pallet
Sleeve
Spiral Binding
Spot Coating / Spot UV
Spot Color
Stochastic Screening
Stripping
Swatch Book
Template
Tri-Fold
Trim
Turnaround Time
Typesetting
UV
UV Coating
Varnish
Vendor
Window Envelopes
Work and Tumble
Work and Turn
Z Fold
Zip
ZIP Code
ZIP+4 Codes
ZIP+4 Barcode
Fraction to Decimal Conversion Chart

4-Panel Roll Fold

A type of fold where the piece is folded inward at one end and then folded inward again one or more times. It is as if you are rolling the piece up.

Accordion Fold

A sheet which has been printed on only one side then folded twice in right angles to form a W-shaped four page uncut section. We are able to fold up to 4 panels (8 page max). 5 panel (10 pages) + will be sending out to get folded. Accordion folds are usually 100lb book papers. Such as, brochures and catalogue.

Aqueous Coating

It is used to protect and enhance the printed piece. Aqueous coating is applied to all 100lb gloss book and 100lb gloss cover.

Barcode

A series of vertical bars and spaces that represent any numerical series, most often a correct ZIP Code for the delivery address on a mail piece. The barcode facilitates automated processing by barcode readers and scanners. A barcode also can be used to convey information for delivery confirmation and signature confirmation services. Barcodes that may be used for postal processing are POSTNET and UCC/EAN Code 128.

Bindery

The finishing department, which performs operations on the printed product after it has been printed. The bindery operations are as follows: Folding, Binding, Stitching, Scoring, Perforation, Die Cutting, & Envelope Converting.

Binding

Different methods used to secure loose pages in a book is called binding. Saddle stitch is an example of binding.

Here are additional binding-related terms and definitions:

Book Block — Folded signatures gathered, sewn and trimmed, but not yet covered.

Case Bind — To bind using glue to hold signatures to a case made of binder board covered with fabric, plastic or leather. Also called cloth bind, edition bind, hard bind and hard cover.

Deboss — To press an image into paper so it lies below the surface. Also called tool.

Emboss — To press an image into paper so it lies above the surface. Also called cameo and tool.

End Sheet — Sheet that attaches the inside pages of a case bound book to its cover. Also called pastedown or end papers.

Finished Size — Size of product after production is completed, as compared to flat size. Also called trimmed size.

Foil Emboss — To foil stamp and emboss an image. Also called heat stamp.

Hinged Cover — Perfect bound cover scored 1/8 inch (3mm) from the spine so it folds at the hinge instead of, along the edge of the spine.

Mechanical Bind — To bind using a comb, coil, ring binder, post or any other technique not requiring gluing, sewing or stitching.

Perfect Bind — To bind sheets that have been ground at the spine and are held to the cover by glue. Also called adhesive bind, cut-back bind, glue bind, paper bind, patent bind, perfecting bind, soft bind and soft cover. See also Burst Perfect Bind.

Saddle Stitch — To bind by stapling sheets together where they fold at the spine, as compared to side stitch. Also called pamphlet stitch, saddle wire and stitch bind.

Side stitch — To bind by stapling through sheets along, one edge, as compared to saddle stitch.

Self Cover — Usually in the book arena, a publication not having a cover stock. A publication only using text stock throughout.

Spine — Back or binding edge of a publication

Spiral Bind — To bind using a spiral of continuous wire or plastic looped through holes. Also called coil bind.

Trim Size — The size of the printed material in its finished stage (e.g., the finished trim size is 5 12 x 8 12).

UV Coating — Liquid applied to a printed sheet, then bonded and cured with ultraviolet light.

Varnish — Liquid applied as a coating for protection and appearance.

Bleed

Printed colors that extend past the edge of a page. To cut the job to its actual size the processor has to make sure the job gets printed with 1/8 of an inch bleed some jobs may require more than that.

Blurb

A description or commentary of an author or book content positioned on the book jacket.

Borders

An outline around graphics, text or edge of a sheet.

Brightness

Refers to the percent of light reflected back from a sheet of paper as measured by a light meter reading. Contrast is reduced and highlights are not as strong when paper with a lower brightness is used for a printed piece. Here at 4over, depending on paper brand the papers have different brightness grades, for example Tango has 91 brightness, Balboa ha 90 brightness.

Bulk Mail

Standard Mail or Third Class Mail. Quantities of mail processed for mailing at reduced postage rates. Preparation includes presorting and placing into containers by Zip Code.

C1S paper

Paper coated on one side.

C2S paper

Paper coated on both sides.

Card Stock

Also called cover stock. Mostly heavyweight papers are called cards stock. The thickness of card stock is indicated with point sizes such as 14pt, 16pt.

Carrier Route

The address to which a carrier delivers mail. In common usage, carrier route includes city routes, rural routes, highway contact routes, post office box sections, and general delivery units.

CMYK

The primary colors used in 4-color printing. CMYK are used to reproduce full color on the printed sheet. CMYK also called PROCESS COLOR C: Cyan (Blue) M: Magenta (Red) Y: Yellow K: Key (Black)

Coating

The mixture of clay materials that are applied to paper to improve the smoothness of the paper's surface and improve ink holdout during the printing process. Examples are Aqueous coating (AQ) and UV coating. UV coating adds a gloss finish to the product and also improves the vibrancy of the printed colors. Spot-UV can be applied to selected portions of the piece, while keeping the rest a matte finish.

Color Proof / Epson Proof / Match Print

An image, created by using color inks. Showing what the final printed product will look like. Color proofs within 4 over are called Epson proofs and are an 80%-85% match with the final product.

Color Types

4:4 (4 over 4) - 2 sided full color on front and on back 4:1 (4 over 1) - 2 sided full color on front, black on back 4:0 (4 over 0) - 1 sided full color on front 5:0 (5 over 0) - 1 sided full color + silver/metallic on front 5:1 (5 over 1) - 2 sided full color + silver/metallic on front, black on back 4:5 (4 over 5) - 2 sided full color on front and full color + silver/metallic on back 5:4 (5 over 4) - 2 sided full color + silver/metallic on front and full color on back 5:5 (5 over 5) - 2 sided full color + silver/metallic on front and on back

Consecutive Numbering

Numbering a form or a series of printed material where the number changes sequentially from one to another. Example, if the first one has number 201, the second will get 202; the third would be 203 and so on.

Crop Marks (Guide Marks)

Lines printed in the margin of sheet that indicates to the cutter and bindery where the finished product should be trimmed.

Die Cutting

A specific shape like star, oval, circle, etc (any designs that cannot be done by a straight cut) which is cut by a metal blade.

Direct Mail

Another name for advertising mail sent to targeted markets. It can be any mail class, but it is usually Standard Mail.

Dots Per Inch (DPI)

A measurement of resolution of input, output and display devices. 300 DPI means that when printed, each square inch of your image will contain 90,000 pixels (dots), the higher the DPI (the more pixels per inch) the more crisp the printed image will be. Our electronic (digital files) have to have a resolution of at least 300 DPI. Anything less than that is considered as low resolution and may appear blurry when printed.

Double Gate Fold

Single gate fold, with an additional fold on the center.

Double Parallel Fold

A type of fold where the piece is folded in half and then folded in half again. The folds are parallel to each other. Also known as a quarter fold.

Dummy

Simulation of the final product. Also called mockup.

Embossing

A process of imprinting an image by applying pressure to the back side of a material to change the surface, giving it a three dimensional or raised effect. Embossing can be referred to as raised lettering.

Film Laminate

Thin sheet of plastic bonded to a printed product for protection or increased gloss.

Finished Size / Trim Size

The size of a printed product after all production operations has been completed.

Finishing

An operation to a document after it has been printed. The finishing operations could include bindery work such as, folding, trimming, binding, die cutting, inserting or any post press process that must be completed.

Fixed Costs

Costs that remain the same regardless of how many pieces are printed. Copyrighting, photography and design are fixed costs.

Flat Size

The size of a printed product after printing and trimming but before any finishing operations that affect its size, such as folding.

Folding

The process of bending printed sheets in a specific area. Folding is one of our popular bindery jobs.

French Fold (Quarter Fold)

A sheet which has been printed on one side only and then folded twice at right angles to form a four page uncut section.

Full Bleed

Printing that goes to the edge of all four sides of the page.

Gate Fold

When both sides of an oversize page fold into the gutter in overlapping layers.

Gloss Finish

A coating on paper that provides a higher reflection of light, which results in a shiny appearance. Gloss coatings reduce ink absorption, which allows excellent contrast and color definition.

Gloss Paper

Paper with a gloss finish, usually used for higher quality printing. Examples are 100lb gloss book, and 100lb gloss cover.

Gray Scale

A strip of paper containing gray tones ranging from white to black. So gray scale refers to black and white printed material.

Grippers

Metal finger like clamps that grab the paper to pull it through the press as the sheet is being printed.

Hairline

The thinnest possible line or space that is visible.

Half Fold

Folded in half.

Half-Tri-Fold

A sheet is folded in half and then tri-folded.

Head to Head

Printing on the front and back of a sheet is setup so that the top of both sides is printed at the same end of the sheet. You would turn the sheet like the page of a book to read the reverse side.

Head-to-Toe

Printing on the front and back of a sheet so that the tops of each side are printed at opposite ends from each other. The top of one side is opposite the bottom of the other. You would turn the sheet over from top to bottom to read the reverse side. Also referred to as head-to-tail or tumble.

Hickey

A spot on a printed sheet that appears as a small white circle with ink in the center, caused by particles such as dirt, dust, or bits of paper.

Imprinting

The printing of new copy on a piece that is already printed. Examples of imprinting are ink-jetting addresses on postcards after the actual card has been printed.

In House

When a production process for a printed product is done within a facility and is not sent to an outsider, also referred to as in plant.

Ink Jet

A printing technology in which liquid ink is sprayed through tiny nozzles onto the paper in a pattern of dots, forming the image on the paper. Jobs with AQ or UV coating cannot be ink jet printer.

Insert

A letter, card, or similar item placed inside another mail piece (host piece).

ISBN

A number assigned to a published work and usually found either on the title page or the back of the title page. Considered an International Standard Book Number.

Job Number

A unique number assigned to a job by a buyer or manufacturer. The number allows the job to be tracked throughout production.

Landscape

Printing a page so that when positioned for reading the width is greater than the height.

Line Screen

A transparent screen which has been etched with fine lines. It is used to convert a picture or photograph into a halftone dot pattern so that can be printed.

Line-of-Travel (LOT) Sequence

A sequence required for some Enhanced Carrier Route and carrier route rates in which mail pieces are arranged by ZIP+4 codes in the order in which the carrier serves the route. The mail pieces are sequenced in delivery order.

Make-Ready

1. The process of setting up and adjusting a printing press for a particular ink, paper and specifications prior to printing. This includes adjusting the in feed, grippers and guides, adjusting ink for proper coverage, registering copy, and matching the printed piece with the proof to be sure everything is correct. Also referred to as set up.2. The paper used while making all the necessary adjustments before printing the actual run. Also referred to as set up.

Margin

The non-printed areas around the image area of a page.

Matte Finish

A coated paper finish that is flat, not shiny like a gloss, but still keeps much of the ink from being absorbed by the paper and produces an excellent image. Matte/ Dull finish are applied to all 14pt jobs and 16pt jobs unless it is Spot UV.

Offset Printing

The transfer of an inked image from a plate to a blanket cylinder, which in turn transfers the image to the printing material as it passes between the blanket, and the impression cylinder and pressure is applied. Also referred to as offset lithography.

Open End Envelope

An envelope with an opening along its short dimension.

Open Side Envelope

An envelope with an opening along its longest dimension.

Out of Register / Off Register

When an image is not printing in the exact location that it is suppose to. When printing more than one color, if the colors do not line up properly, they are out of register.

Output

Sending information from a computer to a printing device to produce a printed page is called output.

Overprinting

Printing an image over an area that has already been printed. In printing process colors, one process color is printed over another creating a secondary color, which is a combination of two primary colors.

Overruns / Overs

The quantity of items produced over the quantity that was originally ordered. Also referred to as any paper spoiled in the process of printing. Overage policy varies in the printing industry. Advance questions avoid blind knowledge.

Pantone Matching System (PMS)

A registered name for an ink color matching system used to compare, match and identify specific colors.

Paper

Paper-related terms and definitions:

Acid-free Paper — Papermade from pulp containing little or no acid so it resists deterioration from age. Also called alkaline paper, archival paper, neutral pH paper, permanent paper and thesis paper.

PPI — Number of book pages per inch. The higher the PPI the less bulky the book will be after binding

C1S and C2S — Abbreviations for coated one side and coated two sides.

Calender — To make the surface of paper smooth by pressing it between rollers during manufacturing.

Caliper — (1) Thickness of paper or other substrate expressed in thousandths of an inch (mils or points), pages per inch (ppi), thousandths of a millimeter (microns) or pages per centimeter (ppc). (2) Device on a sheetfed press that detects double sheets or on a binding machine that detects missing signatures or inserts.

Coated Paper — Paper with a coating of clay and other substances that improves reflectivity and ink holdout. Mills produce coated paper in the four major categories cast, gloss, dull and matte.

Creep — Phenomenon of middle pages of a folded signature extending slightly beyond outside pages. Also called feathering, outpush, push out and thrust. See also Shingling.

Opacity — (1) Characteristic of paper or other substrate that prevents printing on one side from showing through the other side. (2) Characteristic of ink that prevents the substrate from showing through.

Uncoated Paper — Paper that has not been coated with clay. Also called offset paper.

Paper Grain

The direction in which the fibers line up during the manufacturing process. It is easier to fold, bend, or tear the paper along the same direction of the fibers. Cut sheet laser printers generally use long grain paper in which the grain runs parallel to the long side of the paper, resulting in better performance through the laser printer.

Perfecting

The process of printing both sides of a sheet of paper in the same pass through the press.

Perfector

Printing presses that can print on the front and the back of the paper in one pass through the press.

Perforation

Creating a series of holes so that the paper can be torn more easily along the line that is formed. Postage stamps and tear-off cards are common products that require perforation.

Pixel

The smallest unit of a digitized image created by a digital device, such as a computer, camera, or scanner. Pixel is short for "picture element." The more pixels per inch the better the resolution.

Plate

A metal or paper light-sensitive sheet that holds an image that has been photographically produced. During the printing process, the image area picks up ink, which is then transferred to a blanket and then to paper.

Postage

Payment for delivery service that is affixed or imprinted to a mail piece, usually in the form of a postage stamp, permit imprint, or meter stamp.

Pre-Press

Pre-press-related terms and definitions:

Alteration — Any change made by the customer after copy or artwork has been given to the service bureau, separator or printer. The change could be in copy, specifications or both. Also called AA, author alteration and customer alteration.

Author's Alterations (AA's) — At the proofing stage, changes that the client requests to be made concerning original art provided. AA's are considered an additional cost to the client usually.

Camera-ready Copy — Mechanicals, photographs and art fully prepared for reproduction according to the technical requirements of the printing process being used. Also called finished art and reproduction copy.

Color Key — Brand name for an overlay color proof. Sometimes used as a generic term for any overlay color proof.

Crop Marks — Lines near the edges of an image indicating portions to be reproduced. Also called cut marks and tic marks.

Crossover — Type or art that continues from one page of a book or magazine across the gutter to the opposite page. Also called bridge, gutter bleed and gutter jump.

Desktop Publishing — Technique of using a personal computer to design images and pages, and assemble type and graphics, then using a laser printer or imagesetter to output the assembled pages onto paper, film or printing plate. Abbreviated DTP.

Digital Proofing — Page proofs produced through electronic memory transferred onto paper via laser or ink-jet.

DPI — Considered as "dots per square inch," a measure of output resolution in relationship to printers, imagesetters and monitors.

Page — One side of a leaf in a publication.

Page Count — Total number of pages that a publication has. Also called extent.

Pre-Press — Camera work, color separations, stripping, platemaking and other prepress functions performed by the printer, separator or a service bureau prior to printing. Also called preparation.

Permit

Authorization required to mail without affixing postage. A postage imprint, also referred to as an indicia (The imprinted area in the upper right corner of the mail piece that indicates postage payment), is used instead. An advance payment is made to the post office and postage payment is deducted from that deposit.

Presentation Folder

We offer different kinds of presentation folders, Inner pocket with round cut corner: (1 or 2, left & right pockets are optional) Inner pocket with straight cut corner: (1 or 2, left & right pockets are optional) Business card slit, left or right is also optional.

Presort

The process by which a mailer groups mail by ZIP Code so that it is sorted to the finest extent required by the standards for the rate claimed.

Press

Machine used to print batches.

Here are additional press-related terms and definitions:

Bleed — Printing that extends to the edge of a sheet or page after trimming.

CMYK — Abbreviation for cyan, magenta, yellow and key (black), the four process colors.

Color Break — In multicolor printing, the point, line or space at which one ink color stops and another begins.

Ghosting — (1) Phenomenon of a faint image appearing on a printed sheet where it was not intended to appear. Chemical ghosting refers to the transfer of the faint image from the front of one sheet to the back of another sheet. Mechanical ghosting refers to the faint image appearing as a repeat of an image on the same side of the sheet. (2) Phenomenon of printed image appearing too light because of ink starvation.

Pleasing Color — Color that the customer considers satisfactory even though it may not precisely match original samples, scenes or objects.

PMS — Obsolete reference to Pantone Matching System. The correct trade name of the colors in the Pantone Matching System is Pantone colors, not PMS Colors.

Press Check — Event at which makeready sheets from the press are examined before authorizing full production to begin.

Process Color (Inks) — The colors used for four-color process printing: yellow, magenta, cyan and black.

Shingling — Allowance, made during paste-up or stripping, to compensate for creep. Creep is the problem; shingling is the solution.

Signature — Printed sheet folded at least once, possibly many times, to become part of a book, magazine or other publication.

Soy-based Inks — Inks using vegetable oils instead of petroleum products as pigment vehicles, thus are easier on the environment.

Press Check

Printed sheets from the press that are pulled once all the make-ready has been completed. The sheets are checked for quality and accuracy before authorization is given to go ahead with the full production run.

Press Proof

A proof that is produced on the press using the inks and paper specified for that order.

Press Run

The total quantity of pieces printed during one printing.

Price Break

The order quantity level at which the price of the paper or printed material goes down.

Processing

The department in charge of making customers' files "print ready".

Proofread

Checking a proof for errors or discrepancies from the original copy.

Proofs

A copy of the artwork representing the finished product. It is used for review and approval.

Punching

Drilling of holes through a stack of paper.

Quotation

A price, given by the printer or distributor, based on the specifications supplied for that product.

Register Marks

The printed marks used to align color separations for printing so that each color registers with each other.

Resolution

The measurement of output quality expressed in pixels (dots) per inch on a computer monitor or dots per inch on printed media

RGB

The additive primary colors, red, green and blue, used to display color in video monitors. Printing with a file in RGB color mode will produce a washed out appearance.

Rotation

The turning or positioning of text or an image at different degrees of orientation on a page.

Round Cornering

Using a machine to die cut the corners of forms, cards and books to create a rounded corner.

Saddle Stitching

The method of binding the pages of a section where the folded pages are stitched through the fold from the outside, using a wire staple (stapling).

Samples

Samples of a completed job (a small quantity of the actual job).

Scoring

A crease applied, in a straight line, to a sheet of paper to allow it to fold easier and more accurately.

Set Up

  1. The process of setting up and adjusting a printing press for a particular ink, paper and specifications prior to printing. This includes adjusting the in feed, grippers and guides, adjusting ink for proper coverage, registering copy, and matching the printed piece with the proof to be sure everything is correct. Also referred to as set up.
  2. The paper used while making all the necessary adjustments before printing the actual run. Also referred to as set up.

Shrink Wrapping

A method of wrapping packages or products with a plastic film and then applying heat so that the wrap fits tight to the product. Shrink-wrapping is used to package a product in specific quantities and is also used for protection purposes. It also adds some stability to the product when storing

Skid / Pallet

A wooden platform used to hold stacks of paper or cartons. Used to store or ship materials or finished products.

Sleeve

A paperboard jacket that fits over the four sides (top, bottom, and two parallel sides) of a letter tray in order to keep the mail inside the tray from falling out.

Slitting

Cutting paper by the use of a cutting wheel. Paper may be split into smaller sheets or a web of paper may be split into narrower rolls.

Spiral Binding

Book binding that consists of a spiral wire or plastic that is wound through holes. Also referred to as coil binding.

Spot Coating / Spot UV

Coating paper only in specific areas as opposed to all over coating. In a Spot UV job the job gets a UV coating in only specific areas and does not get any AQ coating in any other places. Spot UV can be referred to as spot varnish.

Spot Color

Printing with one or more solid colors, generally black ink is used with the addition of other colors. It is used to add highlight and add color to a printed product without having to print with four-color process.

Stochastic Screening

Images are converted digitally into screens made up of very small dots which are equal in size, but of variable spacing. The variable dot pattern eliminates many of the moiré patterns and allows for more than four colors to be used to represent an image. This is the primary aspect of high-fidelity printing.

Stripping

  1. To assemble and combine film or negatives to produce the final film for plate making. This process is now done electronically by many companies, bypassing the manual process altogether.
  2. In reference to labels it is the removal of the matrix or waste material from around a pressure sensitive label after it has been die cut.

Swatch Book

A booklet containing samples of paper or ink colors.

Template

A preset model that acts as a structure for setting up a similar product.

Tri-Fold

A fold where a three panel piece has both side sections folded inward, one on top of the other each section is approximately 1/3 the length of the piece. Also known as a C-fold or letter-fold.

Trim

  1. The process of cutting the product to its finished size. The excess that is cut off is also referred to as the trim.
  2. Combining various roll sizes to be slit from a full width roll from the paper machine so that an acceptable percentage of the salable width will be used.

Turnaround Time

The accumulated time between receipt of an order and completion of the finished product.

Typesetting

The process of converting text into type used for printing.

UV

Ultra Violet. The part of the spectrum where the wavelength of light is shorter than the wavelength of visible light.

UV Coating

A liquid coating applied to the printed piece, which is then bonded and cured with ultraviolet light. This coating is used to provide a protective coating to the printed image.

Varnish

A thin, liquid protective coating, either matte or glossy, that is applied to the product. It adds protection and enhances the appearance of the product. It can be applied as an all over coating or it can be applied as a spot coating.

Vendor

The provider of a product or service. Also referred to as supplier.

Window Envelopes

An envelope with a die cut opening that is intended to have information show through from the piece inside the envelope.

Work and Tumble

A printing method where different pages are assembled so that they are on one plate. One side is printed and the sheet is turned from front to rear so that you are using the opposite edge as the gripper edge and then the second side is printed. The product is then cut apart to make two finished items.

Work and Turn

A printing method where different pages are assembled so that they are on one plate. One side is printed and then the sheet is turned over so that you are using the same gripper edge and then the second side is printed. The product is then cut apart to make two finished items.

Z Fold

A paper fold represented by back and forth folds into three panels.

Zip

Zipping is a way to compress electronic files a compressed file is considered "zipped."

ZIP Code

A system of 5-digit codes that identifies the individual post office or metropolitan area delivery station associated with an address. ZIP+4 are an enhanced code consisting of the 5-digit ZIP Code and four additional digits that identify a specific range of delivery addresses.

ZIP+4 Codes

A nine digit numeric code composed of two parts: (a) the initial code: the first five digits that identify the sectional center facility and delivery area associated with the address, followed by a hyphen; and (b) the four-digit expanded code: the first two additional digits designate the sector (a geographic area) and the last two digits designate the segment (a building, floor, etc.)

ZIP+4 Barcode

A nine-digit POSTNET barcode consisting of 52 vertical bars. Also see Postal Numeric Encoding Technique.

Fraction to Decimal Conversion

Fraction

1/64

1/32

3/64

1/16

5/64

3/32

7/64

1/8

9/64

5/32

11/64

3/16

13/64

7/32

15/64

1/4

 

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Decimal

.015625

.03125

.046875

.0625

.078125

.09375

.109375

.125

.140625

.15625

.171875

.187

.203125

.21875

.234375

.25

Fraction

17/64

9/32

19/64

5/16

121/64

11/32

23/64

3/8

25/64

13/32

27/64

7/16

29/64

15/32

31/64

1/2

 

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Decimal

.265625

.28125

.296875

.3125

.328125

.34375

.359375

.375

.390625

.40625

.421875

.4375

.453125

.46875

.484375

.5

Fraction

33/64

17/32

35/64

9/16

37/64

19/32

39/64

5/8

41/64

21/32

43/64

11/16

45/64

23/32

47/64

3/4

 

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Decimal

.515625

.53125

.546875

.5625

.578125

.59375

.609375

.625

.640625

.65625

.671875

.6875

.703125

.71875

.734375

.75

Fraction

49/64

25/32

35/64

13/16

53/64

27/32

55/64

7/8

57/64

29/32

59/64

15/16

61/64

31/32

63/64

1

 

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Decimal

.765625

.78125

.796875

.8125

.828125

.84375

.859375

.875

.890625

.90625

.921875

.9375

.953125

.96875

.984375

1.0